Posts Tagged ‘Pakistan’

In continuation to my posts about “The One Rupee Project”, I am delighted to reproduce hereunder another post written by Mrs. Oana Ali who also graced the Launching ceremony by her presence. We are highly grateful for her kind contribution and support.

Here it goes:

My Journey to Pakistan Part 10: The One Rupee Project

On Sunday, March 24th, I had the privilege of meeting some great people and find out more about their commitment in making Pakistan a better place through a new project called The One Rupee Project.

It was presented as a project of the community for the community. Anyone can join in and lend a helping hand and through the power of the many, offer education to the people who can’t afford it and reach the goal of making everyone in Pakistan self-sustainable.
What I love most about this project is that anyone who wants to help can actually do it by joining the One Rupee Project. You don’t have to be rich, you only need to care. You can contribute with as little as you can afford (1 rupee is the equivalent of USD 1 cent), but for a country with over 170 million people, 1+1 could make millions. If one quarter of the population contributed with 1 rupee per day, that would make 42 million rupees per day and would pay for one full year of studies for thousands of Pakistanis. It may seem difficult, but it is not impossible. With the support from media and few corporations, this project can shape a new future for a country who needs it so desperately and who is struggling to make a change.
I will keep my eyes on the people behind the One Rupee Project (Abdul Hameed Kath, Sarfaraz M Khan and Sarosh Waiz) as they have many other ideas worth fighting for and they have the energy and determination to see them come to life.

Conclusions of the day:
There are people in this country who studied at the most prestigious universities from UK, US and elsewhere and who came back to help their homeland make a turn for a better future
People with normal jobs, businesses, families take time to think about the country’s welfare instead of sitting back and enjoying their own success.

Posted by Oana Ali at 10:46 AM

Source: My Journey to Pakistan Part 10: The One Rupee Project


The 24th March, 2012, a day which was long awaited and we all the teammates were quite tensed until the official launch of our project called “The One Rupee Project – TORP”, a project to make “Khudmukhtaar Pakistan” finally took place.

The event was held at T2F with a great support of all our friends, colleagues, family members, supporters and followers. Our special thanks goes to Radio 1 FM91, for their support in organizing the Launch meetup. We’re highly indebted to PeaceNiche (T2F) for their support for the cause of making Pakistan self-sustainable. We are also grateful to Djuice Pakistan who became the 1st Corporate supporter of TORP.

Alhamdulillah, by the grace of Almighty Allah, the event went successful and the entire team of TORP was overwhelmed by the phenomenal response from the participants.

My purpose of posting this blog is just to let people of Pakistan know what people are talking about this project. Hence, here I will be reproducing the testimonials, comments and feedback from all our supporters, members, well wishers and off course the critics.

Below is a worth mentioning write up by Mr. Ali Rahman about the Launch event. Here it goes:

The name, “One Rupee Project”, being quite appealing, made it simply irresistible as I came across it initially on Dr. Awab Alvi’s facebook page and twitter. The project, from whatever was shared of it initially, seemed to be a very simple initiative and was able to capture my attention. One Rupee?, I thought to myself, and thought how it is not a problem for many others. An almost immediate virtual calculator was turned on and I concluded within myself how easily this One Rupee can be millions and billions.
The desire to learn more about the project kicked in and I got to the initiators of the “One Rupee Project”. The Tremendous Trio as I would like to refer to them, Sarfaraz Khan, Abdul Hameed Kath and Sarosh Waiz. Initial contact was established with Mr. Sarfaraz Khan through twitter which got on to personal email correspondence. At this time, I must extend my gratitude towards his humble replies to my incessant questioning. The more I communicated, the more I thought, how doable, how easy, how simple, yet how magnificent this can be.
I then learnt about the launch event which took place a little while back (March 24, 2012 1600 hrs) at T2F (The Second Floor), DHA Phase 2 Extension, Karachi. I, along with my brother and a friend, made it a point that we all be present at the event to gather as much information as possible in order to be able to tell more and more people about it. The event started quite aptly started with Mehdi Maloof’s 1947 which set the much desired focus and direction towards what the “One Rupee Project” aims to achieve. A detailed presentation on the overall concept was conducted by Sarosh Waiz, a young man whose passion about the project was evident even when he was silent.
In a nutshell, the project aims at raising funds and channelizing these funds towards the areas which, otherwise may be state responsibility. A few areas highlighted include education, vocational training, poverty alleviation, all this to an eventual self sustaining, self relying nation at an individual level. From what I understood, the main objective of the program is capacity building which can be related to an old adage “give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach him how to fish and you feed him for a lifetime”. This project certainly aims at “teaching people how to fish”.
It was heart-warming to learn the pledges already made by Dr. Awab (Awab Dental Clinic) and a few others. From the perspective of a common man, I salute FM 91 and Djuice for recognizing the potential of this project and sponsoring the launch event. Presence of Faisal Kapadia (award winner Azmeaalishan 2012 for his selfless services) was also much more than pleasant.
What this means to me? Well the answer is very simple. I have spent many hours discussing issues with my brother, my wife, my friends on what or how wrong things are in my part of the world and in our dear Pakistan. Being a banker by profession, somehow, as much as I desired, it was always difficult to come together and do something concrete, to add value, or to do something about all the problems and issues that I spend hours, just discussing. “One Rupee Project” has given me a very easy solution. From now on, I don’t have to spend time complaining or discussing the issues. I have found a forum which I can be a part of by paying just “One Rupee” a day and be a part of the much needed change. I take it as a responsibility to talk about this initiative to people, to spread the word, to make sure that people become a part of it.
The project is in a nascent stage at this time. However, from the charge and passion which was witnessed in the hall of T2F today, it can be safely said that this humble beginning can and will end up in pure magnificence. It will provide that much needed impetus needed for overall amelioration. The reasons why I have such strong belief in this project are: 1) In that hall at T2F, I met with Pakistanis, not Sindhis, Punjabis, Mohajirs, Balochis or Pakhtoons, just Pakistanis. 2) It is of utmost convenience to be a part of this at just “One Rupee” per day. Therefore, I expect it, hope and pray for it to grow to monumental levels. Anyone and everyone can and should be a part of this.
Undoubtedly, a great beginning! All the best to the “One Rupee project”.
Hasti ke is saraab mein, raat ki raat bas rahi
Subh e adam hua numoon, paun utha jo ho so ho
Let us all make this happen, because together we can and we will!
Ali Rahman
Email: ali.sher.rahman@gmail.com
Twitter: @Baahirezaman
Facebook: https://facebook.com/ali.sher.rahman

Dear Followers,

This is in continuation to my previous post “A disturbing article in Time magazine – “Karachi is doomed. Karachi is indestructible”.

I am pleased to reproduce a letter to the Editor, Time Magazine written by Mr. Tony Lazaro who is the Managing Director of Rising Stars Management Group after his kind permission, for that I am very thankful to him.

This letter has not been published by Time Magazine so far (I didn’t find it in its issue of 30-Jan-12), but I found it worthy of posting on to my blog while thinking that we must show the world the positive side of Karachi as well as our country, Pakistan, because unfortunately, every media be it foreign or local is trying to bully us and showing only negativity about Pakistan or maybe they have got only one eye that sees negativity all around but nothing else.

I am reproducing below the letter with a request to you all to please send your comments and feedback, thanks:

The Editor, Time Magazine
Dear Editor,

I recently returned from a charitable trip to Pakistan, whereby I visited both Karachi and Islamabad. I spoke with several universities, key businesses, prominent business leaders and several religious people from all generations….

On the day I returned to the office, someone had placed your magazine (January 16, 2012), on my desk. I read with interest your article on Karachi and the city in doom. For a person to have just returned from the very same place that your magazine described was somewhat bizarre, so I read with great detail your writer (Andrew Marshall’s) account.

Let me begin by saying that I often flick through your magazine and find the articles of great interest, but on this particular day and this particular article, I found certain comments to be both one sided and indeed very negative. I say that because I saw a different Pakistan to what was portrayed in your article. I do not and will not comment on the political or religious problems that the country faces, but I will go so far as to say that not everything is as bad as the image that your magazine paints.

Sure there are deaths in the cities. Please show me a city in the world, that is free from political fighting and unrest.

Sure there are differences in the political party opinions. Please show me a country in the world where the political parties agree.

Sure the innocent are suffering. Please show me a country in the world where wealth and power is equal and the innocent don’t suffer.

Sure corruption is in Pakistan. Please show me a country in the world that is corruption free.

My list could go on, but my point is that Pakistan does have problems…but so does every other country in the world in some way or another. However, in the case of ALL other nations, there are often good things to report and the media goes out of its way to promote these good things across the globe, whenever possible. The ridiculous amount of shootings in the USA are balanced off by the success of Google, Microsoft and Apple. The financial dilemmas of Greece are lost in the marketing of the Greek Islands as a holiday destination of choice. The child slave industry of India, is brushed under the carpet in favour of the nation’s growth in the global software boom. What I am trying to say, is that someone needs to look further into Pakistan and see that there are millions of great stories to write about, which would portray the country in a different light, to that what is being portrayed by your article.

When I was in Pakistan, I visited a towel manufacturing company (Alkaram Towels). They produced some $60million in export in 2011 and are aiming at $85million in 2012. A substantial increase in sales…in a recession I would remind you. The company was started by the current Chairman, Mr. Mehtab Chawla, at the tender age of nine, after his father passed away. Today the very man employs 3000 staff. Now that’s a story.

I visited universities of NED, Hamdard, Karachi, Szabist and NUST. The students are unbelievably intelligent. They spend their spare time developing APPS for android and apple. They are involved in cutting edge technology and no one in the world knows this. Why not send a reporter to Pakistan to look into this. Why not research good things in this nation, rather than just the bad things. At NUST (National Institution for Science and Technology – Islamabad)) there were 38,000 applications for medicine. There are only 83 seats for the medicine course on offer. The competition is unbelievable. In short it pushes the best to be even better. But the world doesn’t know this. Why ? Because no one wants to report on it, or no one knows about it…or both !!

Please do not get me wrong. I understand that news is news, but it is high time that the western world stopped promoting these terrorists and political wars in Pakistan and started to write something that would help the nation. Something positive. If we really care about global partnerships and economic growth, then I suggest we try and give Pakistan a helping hand. There are 180 million people in Pakistan, 65% are under the age of 25. The youth of Pakistan is its strength.. it is like a sleeping giant. If you think that India is a booming nation. I suggest you stop a second and look at Pakistan. Given a little help from the western world, Pakistan can become a dominant economy. She doesn’t want aid and she doesn’t need money… she just wants the chance to be seen in a different light. I believe we have a fundamental obligation to assist. The only question is, who will reach out first.

Warmest regards,

Tony Lazaro
Managing Director
Rising Stars Management Group
Tel: 02 8824 7000
Fax: 02 8824 7766
http://www.risingstars.com.au

I am a subscriber of Time magazine and have been reading it regularly for the past quite a few years. Last week, when I received my copy of January 16, 2012, I literally got shocked to see the cover page that reads, “Pakistan’s Dark Heart – Karachi is dangerous, chaotic, ungovernable — and essential to global economy” By Andrew Marshall.


The article started with a heading, “Karachi is doomed. Karachi is indestructible”. I stopped reading the article at once as the starting few NEGATIVE words of the article about Karachi freaked me out and then the first thing that came into my mind was that as to how to contact Mr. Marshall and talk to him one on one about his views on Karachi and how to show him the positive side of Karachi and even the entire country, Pakistan. But then I started looking at different ways as to how to involve someone not from Karachi but have visited Karachi to write something about the city, so that my writing something about Karachi, being the Karachiite does not look at all a biased viewpoint to him. So I am looking forward to sending a counter article with all positive aspects about Karachi and the entire country, Pakistan by someone very soon as in my view the writer of that article, Mr. Andrew Marshall has got the eye that has seen only the negativity about Karachi but nothing else.

Your views, comments, feedback will help me a lot in preparing my article and I desperately am looking forward to it.

Courtesy: PIECEMEAL

Thanks to PTI for arranging jalsa on Sunday, on Quaid’s birthday and in an enclosed area across Mazar-e-Quaid. People were there for the love of Imran Khan. Youngsters were very excited and the public stayed there until the end of the show. After a long time, it felt like a city free to walk around and talk without fear. No heavy traffic jam especially around Mazar-e-Quaid.

I am not blaming Imran Khan but this was a successful effort of PTI for those who are used to the typical type of political public gatherings, for those who don’t care about dust, sand and pollution, for those who don’t care about discipline. So far nothing different except a true public involvement in Karachi after a long time.
Revolution comes through people. What kind of revolution can people of Pakistan bring? Have they prepared themselves to bring any revolution or will rely on the promises made by PTI and wait for them to bring a change?

I think Imran Khan announced this gathering a month ago. I would have called this the start of a true revolution for a New Pakistan if they had reserved at least twenty thousand out of sixty thousand chairs for women on one side of the ground and a gate for their entrance. Thirty thousand chairs should have been allotted to old men so they can sit and enjoy the show. Men from other provinces and interior need every-second-guidance for which way to walk, where to enter from, to walk in line, leave space for others etc. They don’t have a concept of “others too have a right of way even as a pedestrian”. People with flags should stand on side or all the way in the back or at least sit down so they don’t block the view of others.

It was really hard to breathe due to sand everywhere and people sneezed openly on others without covering their nostrils. A month or two was enough time to maintain that venue. Can’t they grow grass there, make it look pleasant?

By the way, why a crowd has to be on the stage and get tired by standing, moving, spinning, squeezing and leaning?

Change comes through people. Do people have courage to raise their voice against corruption at homes, against their beloved fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, uncles, cousins, in-laws, friends, colleagues and employers?

Imran Khan is right, corruption is easier than to reduce illiteracy. Only if people promise no more fake fake birth certificates, fake medical certificates, fake land documents, fake any kind of official documents, traffic violations, no more dowry, no more show off, no more breaking roads to celebrate their weddings, birthdays, majalis, milad, aqiqa ceremonies and death anniversaries. No more selling marks and positions in exams, no more telling exam syllabus to favourite (useful) students, no more occupying side-walks, no more throwing garbage out of balconies and windows and on streets, no more SPITTING around. No more wall chalking or spraying for publicity, putting banners and pasting flyer on poles, roads, bus stops and roundabouts. No more cheating in selling rotten, damaged, spoiled and expired products and goods.

Imran Khan may lead a successful rally against Zardari, Nawaz Sharif, Altaf Hussain and other political evils. But how would he convince common Pakistanis to end corruption at home?

Common Pakistanis are used to one-man show, they don’t like to talk about boring things like responsibilities of good citizens, duties of good Muslims, importance of rules and laws in a society, etc.
They are still saying that Imran Khan will bring the change. They haven’t said they will change themselves to work with Imran Khan??????????????????????????????

Nato attack: Turkey express solidarity with Pakistan | The News Tribe.

Due to the current worst ever catastrophic Rain Flood in the province of Sindh, millions of people have been displaced and hundreds have lost their lives. All those displaced people had to leave their houses, belonging and are roaming here and there looking for a place or shelter, food and water to live by. It is a pity that they are starving and fighting for their survival. Their hue and cry is genuine. They look totally helpless when they see their children fighting for food, water and clothes.

In this worst and desperate situation, it is the responsibility of every single person and welfare organizations to come forward and contribute for the relief and rehabilitation of our poor countrymen.

It is requested that all the local and international social activists play their role and help those who are in our need…as God help those who help themselves.

At this point in time, food items, tents/shelters, medicines, clothing are badly needed.

We look forward to your kind and brotherly response in this regard.

Pakistan Youth Revolution has joined hands with PK Relief /SA Relief (www.sarelief.com) in collecting funds and supporting the Flood Relief activities.

Please donate generously via “SA Relief” while going to the link http://www.sarelief.com/donate/. You can have complete update through the website as well.

You can also contact PYR Members to collect funds.
PYR Official Group.

Video: Our trip to Badin with SA Relief Team ….. this is the point called “Khoski” Dist. Badin where we distributed some thousands of “ready-to-eat” food hampers.